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Why catch a carp competition has a serious side for pond

Catch a carp competition will be on Sunday, April 2 this year.

Catch a carp competition will be on Sunday, April 2 this year.

The annual catch a carp competition returns to Eagle Vale pond in two weeks and everyone’s invited to throw in a line to win a prize.

But this fun initiative has a serious side.

The aim of the annual competition is to reduce the local carp population and its impact on the pond, which is located within Eagle Farm Reserve.

It causes algal blooms, waterway erosion and a reduction in native fish populations.

The competition is the one day of the year when fishing is permitted at Eagle Vale pond.

As well as fishing there’ll be a range of fun activities for kids, including a fish origami making workshop and water bug identification.

There will also be handy take-home information on sustainable fishing practices.

Entry is free and a range of prizes will be offered across competition categories, including mystery length, biggest carp caught, most carp caught, and smallest carp caught.

A sausage sizzle and raffle will also be provided for participants and their families.

Mayor of Campbelltown George Brticevic says the catch a carp competition had maintained great community interest and support since it started five years ago.

“The competition has been a great success, not only as a fun, family friendly event that raises awareness about an important local issue, but by actually removing over 200 carp from our waterways,’’ Cr Brticevic said.

The 2017 catch a carp competition will run from 7am to 10.30am on Sunday, April 2.

Participants are asked to supply their own fishing equipment and are encouraged to use corn kernels as bait. Not only is it a great bait to catch carp, but it is a preferable alternative to bread, which is bad for the health of our wildlife and waterway.

The noxious species is generally not suitable for consumption, and participants will be required to hand in their catch at the end of the event.

All carp caught will be placed on ice and taken into Sydney Fish Markets, where they will be used to make fertiliser for the garden.

Competition entrants aged 18 and over will require a NSW fishing licence to compete.

To pre-register online or for more information click here.

Carp are generally not fit for human consumption and are mostly used to make garden fertiliser.

Carp are generally not fit for human consumption and are mostly used to make garden fertiliser.

 

 

 

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